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Post your tricks of the trade in this thread. Hopefully we can create a useful resource that everyone can use.
 

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Commercial Contractor
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Got plenty for finishing...but lemme see what I can come up with..

When setting the depth of your screw gun, always do it on a piece of dunnage before production starts as opposed to on the wall during production.

Never tack around any fixtures that you will later cut/route out. Do that after.

Nail the edges, screw the field.

In residential construction. putting adhesive on BOTH the framing & the drywall isn't necessary, but it helps.

When dealing with ceilings hieghts that are "odd"(8'3 for example), measure and hang so that your ripper goes in the middle of the wall, and not at the top or bottom.

Oh, when cutting cementboard..WHERE A MASK!!


That's all for now, I am sure I will add to later.

Your Turn....
 

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other guy
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If you have a lot of sheets of rock to cut the same size, you can stack them flat, and cut them with a cheap circular saw. it'll cut through several layers at the same time while leaving a score mark on the last one. You can use it as a guide for the next cut. Seriously, this works like gangbusters. I've done it this way for years, and it's not a bad idea.

It's not nearly as dusty as you'd think.
 

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Buy a board strecher. When short my hangers always call me and say "it was a little tight on rock but we got out the board strecher and we made it work" I don't know how much they cost, but they must be small because I've never seen it on the job.:whistling2:;)
 

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Nail the edges, screw the field.

In residential construction. putting adhesive on BOTH the framing & the drywall isn't necessary, but it helps.

When dealing with ceilings hieghts that are "odd"(8'3 for example), measure and hang so that your ripper goes in the middle of the wall, and not at the top or bottom.
Hi,
Thanks for the tips. I have a couple of questions.

Why nail the edges?

I never heard of using adhesive, in residential or commercial construction. When and why and where ought adhesive be used?

What's a ripper?

Thanks. Cheers.
 

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Hi,
Thanks for the tips. I have a couple of questions.

Why nail the edges?

I never heard of using adhesive, in residential or commercial construction. When and why and where ought adhesive be used?

What's a ripper?

Thanks. Cheers.
i never nail the edges ever thats for old timers lol however we used grabber glue on all interior walls... meaning not the ones with vapor barrier. just dab a glob of glue at about 16 and 32 inches at every stud except the butts or around boxes, as it is messy while you router. then simply screw the perimeter as you would and put 2 screws about 2 inches away from each other in the center of the sheet every 2 studs ish. get your helper to get the glue on the wall while you cut and measure the sheet... i have no idea what a ripper is... and we dont use glue in commercial as it is usually steel stud... i dont think glue goes on that... but it might!
 

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other guy
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A "ripper" is usually a familiar way of referring to a strip of rock ripped lengthwise from a sheet. I often refer to a circular saw as a "spinsaw" It's faster and easier to pronounce when you're fatigued.

Putting it in the middle keeps the hump away from trim, and gives you enough room on either side to feather it out properly.
 

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1st off for any wall between 8 and 9 ft get 54inch drywall so there is no rip. Any decent drywall company is concerned about call backs and eliminating them. The way we have found best to do that is to use twice the amount of recomended glue and then screw the perimiter and put a few in the middle. Zero nails. Actually no one from our company even carries any in there truck or pouch. Make sure to plan your ceiling layout to span any joist hangers and keep screws away from them as well. Additionly float your ends keeping screws a min of 16 inches from all edges. This allows trusses to move up and down with out cracking corners. If your going to use high sheen paint be sure to do a level 5 finish on the walls. Some may charge a lot for this but dont need to. Be sure to use rocksplicers on all butt joints and no-coat beads for all corners. Also ultraflexx for inside 45's. These all come with there own warrenties if properly installed.
 

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just my opinion

Got plenty for finishing...but lemme see what I can come up with..

When setting the depth of your screw gun, always do it on a piece of dunnage before production starts as opposed to on the wall during production.

Never tack around any fixtures that you will later cut/route out. Do that after.

Nail the edges, screw the field.

In residential construction. putting adhesive on BOTH the framing & the drywall isn't necessary, but it helps.

When dealing with ceilings hieghts that are "odd"(8'3 for example), measure and hang so that your ripper goes in the middle of the wall, and not at the top or bottom.

Oh, when cutting cementboard..WHERE A MASK!!


That's all for now, I am sure I will add to later.

Your Turn....
I agree and disagree on certain points. as a Total drywaller. i've hanging and finishing for 15 years.
Agree:

always check your gun dpeth br you start hanging.
NEVER EVER EVER EVER Screw or Nail off around Receptacle openings untill they are cout our, as tyhis will fracture the board and add unnecessary manhours in repair to the finishing end of the trade. (or punchout that wasnt caught in the finishing process)

NEVER NEVER Nail off the edges, ie perimiter. Use some nails in the bottom roll and one or 2 field areas to Secure (tack off) the board. nailing the perimiters in the angles will really tick off the tapers. Anglehead blades cost $40.ea. and every nail not properly sunk can break the braphite blades.


as far as Rp's are concerned. do your taper a favor. Place it onto the wall with the factory edge (The Roll) Up.
 

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Just my personal Opinion

If you have a lot of sheets of rock to cut the same size, you can stack them flat, and cut them with a cheap circular saw. it'll cut through several layers at the same time while leaving a score mark on the last one. You can use it as a guide for the next cut. Seriously, this works like gangbusters. I've done it this way for years, and it's not a bad idea.

It's not nearly as dusty as you'd think.

In a perfect world. this is a great idea. However, due to bad lumber and other factors. no cut is ever the same. and i for one like to cut @least to within a 1/4 " the odds of several sheets being the same size (without crooked cuts etc) are slim to none.
Please Measure Top and bottom of every sheet, cut crooked if you have to. Make it Tight and you make it Right.
 

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If you have a lot of sheets of rock to cut the same size, you can stack them flat, and cut them with a cheap circular saw. it'll cut through several layers at the same time while leaving a score mark on the last one. You can use it as a guide for the next cut. Seriously, this works like gangbusters. I've done it this way for years, and it's not a bad idea.

It's not nearly as dusty as you'd think.

:blink:Ouch!!! LOL makes me flinch just thinking about it... I'll have to try it! I like it!
 

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Here is a cheat that is only good for us guys who don't hang all the time; Lowes now sells magnetic box finders.... you put one magnetic plastic piece in the box... hang over it and then find it with another box shapped plastic piece with magnets in it.. which lines itself up (and sticks thru the drywall) properly magneticaly... trace it and router it. They come three outlet sides in a pack. They are yellow and in the tool section at lowes.I bought them for FRP worked great! the magnets will stick to each other THRU your hand! they don't like metal commercial boxes though.
 

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Quality Hangers
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Residential hanging:
Use Miracle DSA/20 or OSI Drywall Adhesive(not Liquid Nails or Tite Bond or Earls Glue or any other knockoff and NEVER use Subfloor Adhesive)
Glue along the stud covering the width of the sheet as much as posible without getting it between the rolled edges and/or hands etc. Dont glue butt joints unless you're sure it fits and dont use much then. Don't glue over insulation tabs that are stapled on the face of the stud,in fact tell someone there is an idiot doing insulation in the vicinity. If you absolutely have to live with a gap in a joint or corner it can be filled with glue so the finisher doesn't need alot of mud to pre-fill it and it doesn't shrink later, a little spit on your finger usually keeps it from sticking and you can work it like caulk(yes spit...you're a construction worker right? prissy belongs in the office) They dont call it Miracle for nothing.

Nails....and the sudden demand for the lack of....I nail rolled edges because most lumber lets the screws spin out in the denser edge of the sheet,which means I can either put the screw OUTside the rolled edge and now hear crap about "they need spotted now" or I can try 3 or 4 times,chew up the recess and probably still nail the damn thing. I prefer to screw butt joints but again lumber deters this if its normal 2X's since the lumber these days is trash. Do NOT use ring shank nails....PERIOD. CC Smooth is what you look for. Maryland Steel and Wire if at all possible.

Screws....set the depth on the rock you're hanging in the house you're hanging to determine how soft/hard the lumber/rock are and how deep you need to set it. Most times its fine but don't assume or you'll be going back and setting screws. Screw the fields. Screw the fields. Did you just put a nail in that field?!? Put a screw about an inch from it. Now take off your belt.

Joints....no,put that out this isn't Tijuana....never break on a jack stud,not a window jack,not a door jack. Make it at least 4 inches past the opening. On ceilings find the 'UP' joist or your finisher will need a snow shovel to float it out. Always go for the smallest butt joint,don't run a 12 past a window and make a 4 foot joint 2 feet from the corner/door/etc when you can make a 24 inch joint under/over the window.

Rips...if its 9 foot ceilings get 54" drywall. If you have to use a rip put it either up top or on the bottom,rolled edge to rolled edge. Try to keep the lower tape joint up where the finisher doesn't have to crawl. If possible keep the upper tape joint reachable from the floor. In high rooms over 10 foot a 32 inch rip on the floor puts another joint at 80 inches which stays below most window/door headers and is easily reachable.

Switches/Receptacles/Recessed lights. Measure to the outside edge from the closest surface and write it there. This keeps you from chewing up wires and maybe some unplanned arc welding.

PS Don't listen to El Zol while hanging drywall as this leads to destructive quality ethics and an urge to run at the sight of official uniforms. It also causes my blood pressure to spike and my Estwing develops bloodlust.
 

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:eek: Whew! :)
Residential hanging:
Use Miracle DSA/20 or OSI Drywall Adhesive(not Liquid Nails or Tite Bond or Earls Glue or any other knockoff and NEVER use Subfloor Adhesive)
Glue along the stud covering the width of the sheet as much as posible without getting it between the rolled edges and/or hands etc. Dont glue butt joints unless you're sure it fits and dont use much then. Don't glue over insulation tabs that are stapled on the face of the stud,in fact tell someone there is an idiot doing insulation in the vicinity. If you absolutely have to live with a gap in a joint or corner it can be filled with glue so the finisher doesn't need alot of mud to pre-fill it and it doesn't shrink later, a little spit on your finger usually keeps it from sticking and you can work it like caulk(yes spit...you're a construction worker right? prissy belongs in the office) They dont call it Miracle for nothing.

Nails....and the sudden demand for the lack of....I nail rolled edges because most lumber lets the screws spin out in the denser edge of the sheet,which means I can either put the screw OUTside the rolled edge and now hear crap about "they need spotted now" or I can try 3 or 4 times,chew up the recess and probably still nail the damn thing. I prefer to screw butt joints but again lumber deters this if its normal 2X's since the lumber these days is trash. Do NOT use ring shank nails....PERIOD. CC Smooth is what you look for. Maryland Steel and Wire if at all possible.

Screws....set the depth on the rock you're hanging in the house you're hanging to determine how soft/hard the lumber/rock are and how deep you need to set it. Most times its fine but don't assume or you'll be going back and setting screws. Screw the fields. Screw the fields. Did you just put a nail in that field?!? Put a screw about an inch from it. Now take off your belt.

Joints....no,put that out this isn't Tijuana....never break on a jack stud,not a window jack,not a door jack. Make it at least 4 inches past the opening. On ceilings find the 'UP' joist or your finisher will need a snow shovel to float it out. Always go for the smallest butt joint,don't run a 12 past a window and make a 4 foot joint 2 feet from the corner/door/etc when you can make a 24 inch joint under/over the window.

Rips...if its 9 foot ceilings get 54" drywall. If you have to use a rip put it either up top or on the bottom,rolled edge to rolled edge. Try to keep the lower tape joint up where the finisher doesn't have to crawl. If possible keep the upper tape joint reachable from the floor. In high rooms over 10 foot a 32 inch rip on the floor puts another joint at 80 inches which stays below most window/door headers and is easily reachable.

Switches/Receptacles/Recessed lights. Measure to the outside edge from the closest surface and write it there. This keeps you from chewing up wires and maybe some unplanned arc welding.

PS Don't listen to El Zol while hanging drywall as this leads to destructive quality ethics and an urge to run at the sight of official uniforms. It also causes my blood pressure to spike and my Estwing develops bloodlust.
 

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some thoughts-
1. dont set and forget your depth on your screw gun. With time you will realize when screwing inside corners go 2 or 3 clicks deeper then you will need for the field. This is something I do without even realizing it. Also my gun depth is constantly changing. Again with out really thinking about it.
2. even if its a 8ft house get soome 54inch to avoid little rips on the ceiling and to get the flat above the outlets in the kitchen.
3. If you have an opton between breaking a joint over a window or over a door, choose a window. This joint will get alot less vibration then a joint over a door.
4. Dont try to save money on screws. You end up spending more because half of them will end up on the floor when they dont work.
5. never pick up screws on the floor to use. If you drop the bad ones what is the point. Also trying to make a screw work that has a bad head wastes time and money. drop it
6. leave the nails for the roofers!!!
7. Use rocksplicers. never break joints on framed lumber if you dont have to.
8. If your having trouble with screws in bevels spinning try this. Mark the studs and wait till the bottom sheet is up. Then screw close to the bevel. It works. If you do it before the bottom sheet is jacked up you will blow th ebevel out.
9. Prefill all blow outs and gaps before taping with quick set or straight green. Makes a better job and eeasier taping. some finishers even "V" cut there butt joints and prefill them. If you have ridging issues this helps.
10. Prefilling with glue can create a problem because it shrinks. So if your going to "help" the finisher by prefilling a gap make sure it will set up before he tapes. Better yet use that sheet somewhere else and cut one that fits or as a hanger carry 5 minute with you. I have prefilled my mistakes for the finisher. he was very happy.
11. keep all screws at least a foot away from boxes in the field. Alot of boxes ae mounted on plates and when screwed close to will blow out. Even after there routed.
 

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Man I wish I did that circular saw thing the other day, I hung a elevator shaft double layer and the first layers were the same size for like 20 sheets. That would have worked great. But I wouldn't use it anywhere else.

Nails work fine but only in the rail and edges, where the tape covers them so they don't pop due to vibration and such. Bad screws mess up knives just the same.

V your butts before putting the sheets up, tapers will like you. More referrals.

always check your job off by running your hammerhead over all the screws to make sure they don't click.

I dont set my depth permanently, its always changing.

If something is tight fitting don't just hit it get a butt and hit the edge with something with more surface area so nothin blows out.

When you hang massive ceilings start against the wall in the center of the room. This will keep your sheets from tottering oout of control. If they start, flex them over the butt so the two ends of the rail is tight. Then router the center around the other sheets, this will correct the totter.

White side your sheets when you stock.

Always screw the corners first, so while you screw off the your sheet, the next can be measures and put in place.

If you do break a edge or bulge a nail that you hung over, cut the spot out so the taper doesn't have to.

If you make long rips save the remnants for wrapping windows.

Always remember to hang behind the door in closets before you hang the walls. That sucks when you can't get the sheet in there.

ICE tips work better then anything for your screw gun.

When you cut rips, instead of snapping lines, slid cut it then break it and instead of cutting the back, flew the bend foreward once to weakin the paper and slam the sheet back and it breaks the cut clean. Its way more managable to do it this way. This only works w, 5'8s tho.

If you hang over a very obtrusive box under the rail that pushes the rail out mark it and hang the other sheet before you route it so you can make sure your rail is tight.
 
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