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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone.

About once a month I have a freelance job where I spend the weekend patching and repainting a large photo studio (with multiple interior sets) that is used for home goods product photography.

Their production assistants install multiple items per day to be photographed - and at a fast pace.

When I come in for maintenance, each set will have 100-250 screw and nail holes from floor to ceiling.

When I get on-site I usually go through the whole space and skim over each screw or nail hole with a single edge razor blade - and where there are (what I call) 'volcanos' (where an improper screw or driving technique was used and the drywall rises up around the screw hole -- I'll cut a concave circle.

In the past I've tried tapping these in with a hammer (a ball pean hammer works well) - but with the amount of work that get's done each month, I'm worried that I'm just decimating the wall. So I've strictly stuck to the razor blade method.

My question is this -- is there a hand tool for cutting these concave circles? They obviously make router bits for this, and bits to use on a drill press that make this same shape but I was wondering if anyone has found something to use for this particular problem. Maybe a diy solution?

Thanks very much
 

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i use the handle pummel to dent in nails and screw holes. then you dont have the fuzziest that can stick out. don know of a tool for it. you could sharpen a tube i guess to cut circle n peel face paper?
 

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Hi everyone.

About once a month I have a freelance job where I spend the weekend patching and repainting a large photo studio (with multiple interior sets) that is used for home goods product photography.

Their production assistants install multiple items per day to be photographed - and at a fast pace.

When I come in for maintenance, each set will have 100-250 screw and nail holes from floor to ceiling.

When I get on-site I usually go through the whole space and skim over each screw or nail hole with a single edge razor blade - and where there are (what I call) 'volcanos' (where an improper screw or driving technique was used and the drywall rises up around the screw hole -- I'll cut a concave circle.

In the past I've tried tapping these in with a hammer (a ball pean hammer works well) - but with the amount of work that get's done each month, I'm worried that I'm just decimating the wall. So I've strictly stuck to the razor blade method.

My question is this -- is there a hand tool for cutting these concave circles? They obviously make router bits for this, and bits to use on a drill press that make this same shape but I was wondering if anyone has found something to use for this particular problem. Maybe a diy solution?

Thanks very much
That’s a great gig man. Talk about job security!I’m curious how much you charge and I’d love to see pictures of some of the work. Are you just patching or have you ever considered plastering the whole wall to make it stronger?
 

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Hi everyone.

About once a month I have a freelance job where I spend the weekend patching and repainting a large photo studio (with multiple interior sets) that is used for home goods product photography.

Their production assistants install multiple items per day to be photographed - and at a fast pace.

When I come in for maintenance, each set will have 100-250 screw and nail holes from floor to ceiling.

When I get on-site I usually go through the whole space and skim over each screw or nail hole with a single edge razor blade - and where there are (what I call) 'volcanos' (where an improper screw or driving technique was used and the drywall rises up around the screw hole -- I'll cut a concave circle.

In the past I've tried tapping these in with a hammer (a ball pean hammer works well) - but with the amount of work that get's done each month, I'm worried that I'm just decimating the wall. So I've strictly stuck to the razor blade method.

My question is this -- is there a hand tool for cutting these concave circles? They obviously make router bits for this, and bits to use on a drill press that make this same shape but I was wondering if anyone has found something to use for this particular problem. Maybe a diy solution?

Thanks very much
Bang it in with handle on the 4"
 

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Hi everyone.

About once a month I have a freelance job where I spend the weekend patching and repainting a large photo studio (with multiple interior sets) that is used for home goods product photography.

Their production assistants install multiple items per day to be photographed - and at a fast pace.

When I come in for maintenance, each set will have 100-250 screw and nail holes from floor to ceiling.

When I get on-site I usually go through the whole space and skim over each screw or nail hole with a single edge razor blade - and where there are (what I call) 'volcanos' (where an improper screw or driving technique was used and the drywall rises up around the screw hole -- I'll cut a concave circle.

In the past I've tried tapping these in with a hammer (a ball pean hammer works well) - but with the amount of work that get's done each month, I'm worried that I'm just decimating the wall. So I've strictly stuck to the razor blade method.

My question is this -- is there a hand tool for cutting these concave circles? They obviously make router bits for this, and bits to use on a drill press that make this same shape but I was wondering if anyone has found something to use for this particular problem. Maybe a diy solution?

Thanks very much
A small piece of Cooper piece you can sharpen up with sand paper
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone for your excellent suggestions -I'm definitely going to try some of these. I have to admit, I've been so swamped I haven't had a chance to revisit this page since posting. (Should've set up alerts)

I had a friend recommend sharpening a 1" dowel and hammering -- apparently he's done the same thing for gallery work. The ends get bumped down after a couple days use, but then you just remake or cut the end off.

@Skinner Bros It's just a one time a month job (I work in an art gallery full time and am happy to get this freelance job once a month) - its a day rate of 350 before taxes. Have to do the whole set in two days time. It's definitely good pay, but a constant jog it feels like. I've thought about plastering the whole wall - this will likely need to happen at some point, I'm pretty sure the wall is mostly patched joint compound at this point. May propose at least doing a skim to reduce the texture (good for the photo touchup team). I'll try and take some before/after pics next time I'm on site.

thanks again everyone.
 

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look up roll skimming. i have done it a couple times over the years on hack paper removal jobs. guards seals the blisters down and the mud goes over.
 
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