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I recently started working with a crew that primarily handles the carpentry aspects of whole house builds. For smaller additions, especially in this slower time of year, we have been doing our own taping. I have taped enough to be semi-competent and have my own home to hang/finish myself in the near future. I was thinking today that finishing wall-to-wall inside corners are a breeze compared to their ceiling-to-wall counterparts. It makes sense to given that a ceiling/wall transition consisting of one or two tapered joints is actually an acute angle at the very apex, rather than a consistent 90 degrees when framed well. So I find it harder to keep the side I am not working on clean and when it comes to the 3-point corner, finishing one side will often gouge another, even when properly following the one side at a time protocol.
How do you work around this?
I can think of a few options and none are ideal. For instance,
-fill tapers with hot mud THEN tape?
-if I am hanging and baseboard coverage will allow, rip off the tapers and put two square ends in the corner?

I realize the answer could just be practice, but I'm wondering if there is something I am missing here. The guys on my crew are little to no help when it comes to asking about fine details. I don't think they care all that much.

Thanks for any advice!
 

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That’s one of the hardest parts of drywall for sure. I try to hit it anytime I’m near, going different ways you don’t want adjacent corners both with wet mud. 1st pass I’ll hit left ceiling and right wall one way, 2nd pass I try the opposite. I don’t have smooth finishing mastered by any means but am starting to practice having the “perfect” amount of mud on my knife when I apply, I’m starting to see that removing the excess is one of the most time consuming aspects of finishing. Also No need in having a ton of leftover to scrape off and feather, the perfect amount of mud, built up on the side of knife going into corner with no mud on the feathering edge of knife, will give a great corner first time without oozing the excess into the other side. If excess is on the other side I’ll wait till it’s stiff or completely dry and carefully push my 6“ or 8” knife into the corner easily to make the “opposite side buildup” just flake off
 

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Use a 4 inch knife, correct consistency of drywall compound is a must, and the correct amount on knife when applying the compound will help also....just tips to help out
 
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