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Hopefully the photo is clear - walls riddled with pinholes (among other issues). This work was done by a professional contractor and I don’t know the specifics on methods, materials used, etc.
How would you approach remedying the pinholes if you walked into this scenario as is? Pinholes are prevalent throughout the entire first floor of our home.
TIA
I
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thats a reaction with the fast set and the paint. i get it fairly often with my repairs. some paints worse than others. the mud has to be tight skimmed back and forth till they go away. scrape over wall then put mud on and take it off. working it both ways a couple times before wiping tight seems to help. its a pain i know.
 

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Yeah this is an annoying and time consuming fix. Based off the fact every wall has these pin holes I'm assuming there was a problem when applying primer and paint. This can happen with drywall joint compound but for it to be on the scale, was every wall painted and you had them glaze on top of the paint?

Does the contractor need to fix this or you? If you need to do this yourself buy a small bucket of light joint compound water it down so it's easy to work with get your spatula put it on the pin holes and wipe it off completely to where only the pins are covered. You can use all purpose as well but it'll be harder to sand.

Professionally I would tell the home owner that pinholes can be a result of any of the following: Poor environmental conditions. Contaminated surface prior to painting, coating or lining application. Poor atomisation of the material during spray application.
 

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In case others were not clear, you want to apply a skim coat over all of those surfaces. A very thin coat that essentially just fills the holes. If you use "Topping Compound" (4.5 gallon pail at Home Depot with blue lid) you should thin it a little, maybe 2-3 cups of water in the whole bucket and see how it feels. You should have a large mixing paddle on a good drill. Something like this HD Mixing paddle And apply it with a 10" drywall knife. When they say "tight" they mean a very thin coat. If the 4.5 gallon bucket is too much, I'd suggest 45 minute mud. HD 45 Minute Mud The BEST way to feel comfortable tackling this kind of project is to watch Ben on his Vancouver Carpenter channel on YouTube. He's an excellent teacher and worth the time taken to learn from him. In this video he demonstrates how to deal with bubbles. NOT the exact problem you have, but similar and this video will help you (or whoever you hire to do it.)
 
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