Drywall Talk - Professional Drywall and Finishing Contractors Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
I make love to my walls
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, long time no post. Ill admit there's probably an answer on here already but i just dont have the patience right now to search. Anywho, Im trying to get a new builder 10 min from my house doing a few subdivisions all 6000 sf homes. He wants everything glued and I never used the stuff on my jobs ( yea i know..bla bla bla) Im trying to get an accurate material cost and have no idea how many tubes ill need. How many sheets will a tube cover? Thanks in advance<br>
 

·
drywall slave
Joined
·
10,565 Posts
Where ya been trowel slinger? Still got dura bond Don on the dash?
Sounds like your busy..I am glad to hear that. Some hangers here say 1 tube per 10 sheets [4x12] I disagree ....I use 1 tube per 5 to 7 boards ..
I only glue the studs behind the field of the board ..1/4'' bead ..


A 500 board home...I [myself] would order 6 cases 72 tubes..OSI.!
The liquid nails drywall glue will wash off your hands with [email protected] I don't consider that a glue....OSI Is a real drywall adhesive ..IMO..

I've seen hangers hang 10 or more boards then go back and screw the field by that time the glue has a skim and wont stick as well...screw the field off asap...but then I don't put many screws in the field.[walls] 1 every other stud..If that..ceilings 2 per joist..I know WTMI...[SMILE]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,507 Posts
Where ya been trowel slinger? Still got dura bond Don on the dash?
Sounds like your busy..I am glad to hear that. Some hangers here say 1 tube per 10 sheets [4x12] I disagree ....I use 1 tube per 5 to 7 boards ..
I only glue the studs behind the field of the board ..1/4'' bead ..


A 500 board home...I [myself] would order 6 cases 72 tubes..OSI.!
The liquid nails drywall glue will wash off your hands with [email protected] I don't consider that a glue....OSI Is a real drywall adhesive ..IMO..

I've seen hangers hang 10 or more boards then go back and screw the field by that time the glue has a skim and wont stick as well...screw the field off asap...but then I don't put many screws in the field.[walls] 1 every other stud..If that..ceilings 2 per joist..I know WTMI...[SMILE]
Crazy all the stuff I learn on here.
I myself have never done this. Neither does anyone else around these parts. Everything is screwed. I understand allot of people glue the walls down south. So what do you do moore? Run a bead on all the studs behind the sheet and screw all your bevels and butt joints off but not the field? Just a couple in the field to make sure the glue holds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Crazy all the stuff I learn on here.
I myself have never done this. Neither does anyone else around these parts. Everything is screwed. I understand allot of people glue the walls down south. So what do you do moore? Run a bead on all the studs behind the sheet and screw all your bevels and butt joints off but not the field? Just a couple in the field to make sure the glue holds?

Yes, That's the way I do it.:yes:
 

·
drywall slave
Joined
·
10,565 Posts
Crazy all the stuff I learn on here.
I myself have never done this. Neither does anyone else around these parts. Everything is screwed. I understand allot of people glue the walls down south. So what do you do moore? Run a bead on all the studs behind the sheet and screw all your bevels and butt joints off but not the field? Just a couple in the field to make sure the glue holds?
YES..Just like that..


When it comes to field screws ..I just pray to GOD that he loves me!:whistling2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,507 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
Just don't glue behind joins or where you're later going to put screws, as glue dries it can pull the board back and pop screws etc..everything in New Zealand is glued and screwed, except Fireline.

The method I like best is where builders screw the perimeter of the board and glue the center stud and dwangs (horizontal bits) and then screw a couple of hand sized peices of drywall over top in order to hold the sheet back while the glue sets, when these are removed there are only pin pricks left and no screws on the board to pop etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,507 Posts
Just don't glue behind joins or where you're later going to put screws, as glue dries it can pull the board back and pop screws etc..everything in New Zealand is glued and screwed, except Fireline.

The method I like best is where builders screw the perimeter of the board and glue the center stud and dwangs (horizontal bits) and then screw a couple of hand sized peices of drywall over top in order to hold the sheet back while the glue sets, when these are removed there are only pin pricks left and no screws on the board to pop etc.
Hmm Interesting....Makes sense though.
I will give that a shot!
 

·
post whore
Joined
·
7,772 Posts
Hmm...Well i might give that a shot on the next bigger house I do.
Seems worth while trying anyways.
How, most of our walls have poly on them, here in the great white North.

Plus another reason, up here at least, the cost difference don't pan out. But not to knock the wind out of your sails. If your contracting your own work, I would try using it in the stairwells. I know I don't half to tell you thats where you get your most screw pops:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,507 Posts
How, most of our walls have poly on them, here in the great white North.

Plus another reason, up here at least, the cost difference don't pan out. But not to knock the wind out of your sails. If your contracting your own work, I would try using it in the stairwells. I know I don't half to tell you thats where you get your most screw pops:thumbsup:
Well I figured maybe on interior walls?...
But muh, dont matter to me.
I was just willing to try something new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
How, most of our walls have poly on them, here in the great white North.

Plus another reason, up here at least, the cost difference don't pan out. But not to knock the wind out of your sails. If your contracting your own work, I would try using it in the stairwells. I know I don't half to tell you thats where you get your most screw pops:thumbsup:

Our houses dont have poly on walls or lids. Most homes built in the 70s and 80s had poly until they realized it was causing moisture problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,507 Posts
Our houses dont have poly on walls or lids. Most homes built in the 70s and 80s had poly until they realized it was causing moisture problems.
Same here..died out around mid 80s..
Really? No poly anywhere? That blows my mind..Thats news to me..
What keeps the insulation in?
 

·
drywall slave
Joined
·
10,565 Posts
Really? No poly anywhere? That blows my mind..Thats news to me..
What keeps the insulation in?
Staples..:) Poly went out about the time I started in this po mans trade..I do remember walking into homes in the summer months to see droplets of water behind the poly dripping down to the plate which then caused the insulation to lose its R value not metion could cause the bottom plate to rot over time ..too much humidity here for the poly..Homes here do need to be insulated better than the codes call for IMO..but they also need to breath.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,507 Posts
Staples..:) Poly went out about the time I started in this po mans trade..I do remember walking into homes in the summer months to see droplets of water behind the poly dripping down to the plate which then caused the insulation to lose its R value not metion could cause the bottom plate to rot over time ..too much humidity here for the poly..Homes here do need to be insulated better than the codes call for IMO..but they also need to breath.
Hmm, makes sense. :yes:
 

·
Mudder Lover
Joined
·
1,974 Posts
Out here they heat the buildings then run around with moisture meters waiting for humidity to drop to insulate and poly. As soon as the insulation inspector is done it is not uncommon to see the general contractor running around slashing the poly as the board is going up. haha.

 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top