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The problems with heat pumps are the up front cost is high, and in my neck of the woods they don't produce enough heat in the winter by themselves, they need some sort of supplemental heat. What you use is up to you. Some use an electric coil, some use a gas or oil burner.

I want to put one in my place, but I can't swallow the $15,000 I was quoted.:censored:
That sounds really high. When I got my heat pump I also got a backup air handler with it. Basically that is an electric furnace that sits in my basement and when the temp drops below freezing it heats my house. Some company's try and get rich off every installation mostly the ones that are geared more towards homeowners. I got 3 estimates when I got mine one was close to 11,000 (geared towards homeowners) the other 2 I called guys I knew from different jobs they both came in around 4700 I used the most local guy for service reasons and it works great. I could have a geothermal installed for under 11,000 you might want to call some different people to get your estimates.
 

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Easiest solution I can think of is to turn it on, let it heat up, and then feel the board. I would imagine that where the elements are would be warmer than the rest of the ceiling. Can you hang the speakers from the wall instead?


I seen an electrician find those wires one time. He had some kind of tracer that picked up a signal and located them.
 

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Around here we produce electricity from hydro power, sent it to California when they need it and we are still waiting to get paid for it. We got ripped off again.
 

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I just bought a house that has it working in each room, don't use it as the previous owners added 95% efficient gas furnace. Still kind of cool, I could add a little heat in a room if I wanted. Never put this up when building houses, but electricity use to be cheap and people did use it. Kind of like zone heating. BTW this house was built in 1967.

Wish I could see the marks for where the wires are, want to add some lights. Doubt I will ever turn it on so I could just start cutting and fill holes where the thermostats are in each room, just hate to take and destroying something still working. Taking it off would free up a lot of breakers.
 

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I just bought a house that has it working in each room, don't use it as the previous owners added 95% efficient gas furnace. Still kind of cool, I could add a little heat in a room if I wanted. Never put this up when building houses, but electricity use to be cheap and people did use it. Kind of like zone heating. BTW this house was built in 1967.

Wish I could see the marks for where the wires are, want to add some lights. Doubt I will ever turn it on so I could just start cutting and fill holes where the thermostats are in each room, just hate to take and destroying something still working. Taking it off would free up a lot of breakers.
turn it on high and get a http://www.thermalcameraexperts.com...mpaign=Brand Names&utm_term=Milwaukee Thermal
 

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Is anybody here old enough to remember electric heat sheetrock? We had one particular contractor that put it in all of his houses. The sheets had a
"pigtail" that you pitched up over the ceiling joists and the electrician wired
them later. All of the heat was in the ceiling. They had full heat sheets, half heat sheets, and 1/3 heat sheets. You received a plan on which sheets went where. The remainder of sheets were 5/8 firecode. (typical houses in those days were all 1/2" regular walls and ceilings) It was a really clean even radiant heat. Only drawback was you still had to put in an air conditioning system. Sheets were marked so you didn't nail thru the wires. Just Curious
That electric radiant stuff was crapola. Cracked all of the ceiling joints due to expansion and contraction. It was around for a couple of years in the early 1980's. Then there were mylar pads installed to the framing beneath the sheetrock. Very expensive heat to use, but cheap to install. Mostly used in condos. Hot water radiant heat seems to be much better.
 

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Sorry to bump such an old thread. I am looking at a small house that has this for heat. My question is...would you buy it? It is working currently, but I probably would switch to a different heat source. How expensive would this be to replace. From your knowledge would you walk away because of this kind of heating?
 

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I remember seeing that stuff when I was starting in the trade / late '70,s
Used it up in Idllywild mountain homes [ elv. 5300 ft]

Lots of time up in angled ceiling loft rooms
Think A. Frame cabin
That way would not have to get ductwork up there
 
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