Drywall Talk - Professional Drywall and Finishing Contractors Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have a 60 year old house, full to the studs kitchen reno, one new wall built out of fresh 2x4s.
Have a drywall installer that is insisting they use a particular brand of fine thread screws for hanging 1 1/4 for 1/2" rock.
It is not because they don't want to get a different type of screw than what they normally carry because I am buying all of the materials for them, it must be either that it's easier to drive them in, or they know with the older studs the course will be a problem (screw jacking).

My concern of course is screw heads popping out. Is this install doomed because of the fine thread screws?

I sampled driving the fine vs course in, the fine definitely go in a lot smoother with less splintering of the face of the studs, but they do come out with a hammer claw a lot easier.

Would love to have your input on this . I am working my ass off on this renovation and the wife just doesn't have the patience for me to hang the drywall myself, and I am also lacking a helper to get it done in an timely manner. The mud work I don't have the patience for myself at this time.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
My question is: What kind of screwgun does this dude use? Perhaps a kind running on batteries? You shouldn't have to use sharps for some 60 year old wood. 1 1/4" sharps are for hanging 20ga steel studs. He should be telling you to buy him 1 1/8" coarse threads and the age of the studs doesn't change anything. I replaced plaster & lath with drywall throughout the entire back half of an 80 year old house this past month. Yeah, I had to play with my cone depth a little, & I ended up turning a few screws when I started finishing. Normally I never have to do that, but not all jobs are equal & its always better to have the power to run a proper screw. That's why I own a Hilti with a 15' cord I drag around behind me, and I wouldn't do it any other way. I doubt that many will agree with me, but not all drywall is equal.
 

·
Master Mud Monkey
Joined
·
212 Posts
I think there might be a communication issue. Some guys can't quote the exact regulation off the top of their heads but they know what materials to use. If you see something that's really bad yes call him out but I can think of a few reasons this person would want different screws.

Does your home have a lot of pocket doors that have hard and thin metal frame? Pocket doors, especially high quality ones (heavy wood door) have thin metal framing that need fine small screws, some of that frame is especially thick and hard (small self taping) screws. Maybe you have a bathroom or deck ceiling that needs galvanized or zink dipped screws for greenboard or fiberglass.

Or he might be asking for hot dipped galvanized stainless steel (rust resistant) screws for the shower so the regular screws don't rust with moisture. Is your place next to beach or flood zone where your first floor needs galvanized screws in case it floods? Or he might be asking for durarock or cement board screws with a coating to resist corrosion, a special wide head with cutting flutes and hi-low threads for a strong grip.

I dont know the regulations for Canada but I've worked on homes I need 5 different kinds of screws because of regulations haha. They probably don't cost that much more unless you are on a ridiculously tight budget.

Maybe the wall is a firewall and he needs whatever local regulation screws they want put in homes.

I totally went off about screws for a kitchen remodel lol.

I do agree with these guys that he might be using battery equipment so he wants finer screws or he might want to change out the materials but unless you hired some sketchy guy I wouldn't be that concerned about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Follow up to this thread.
So the guys came and put 20 sheets of drywall up in less than 2 hours. Father-Son Team. Father in his 70's pulls out a corded electric drywall gun, plugs in and does a very decent job. quick but clean work, clean cuts and proper screw depth. The son who claims he had been doing it 35 years had a battery operated unit that didn't seem to have a stopper installed or it wasn't calibrated. He blew well past the paper or missed the studs on about 30-40% of the screws he put in. Under cut the drywall even though I specifically told him the door guy left huge gaps and that I was using a 2 1/4" door trim....

They insisted on fine threaded screws but also used a good amount (50% or so) of course threaded screws left in their pouch. They didn't fill their pouches with the fine threaded screws I bought them, left me with an almost full box of screws I will never need unless I steel stud my basement.

Afterwards the taper that organized the job claimed they were the best, and defended their work. I said if you think they are the best I can't risk you taping/mudding my place. He was ready to just mud over all the blown through screws, and fill all the big gaps with lite weight all purpose and proceed to tape on top. I paid for the hanging and fired him for the taping. I'm sure he was capable, but I just couldn't risk having to get someone come fix a mudded mess.

I recut a few sheets, dug out the badly set screws and added course screws and hired another company to finish. Unfortunately it cost me more money and my time. Lesson learned for next time. Hang my own sheets, and pay someone to come tape it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Follow up to this thread.
So the guys came and put 20 sheets of drywall up in less than 2 hours. Father-Son Team. Father in his 70's pulls out a corded electric drywall gun, plugs in and does a very decent job. quick but clean work, clean cuts and proper screw depth. The son who claims he had been doing it 35 years had a battery operated unit that didn't seem to have a stopper installed or it wasn't calibrated. He blew well past the paper or missed the studs on about 30-40% of the screws he put in. Under cut the drywall even though I specifically told him the door guy left huge gaps and that I was using a 2 1/4" door trim....

They insisted on fine threaded screws but also used a good amount (50% or so) of course threaded screws left in their pouch. They didn't fill their pouches with the fine threaded screws I bought them, left me with an almost full box of screws I will never need unless I steel stud my basement.

Afterwards the taper that organized the job claimed they were the best, and defended their work. I said if you think they are the best I can't risk you taping/mudding my place. He was ready to just mud over all the blown through screws, and fill all the big gaps with lite weight all purpose and proceed to tape on top. I paid for the hanging and fired him for the taping. I'm sure he was capable, but I just couldn't risk having to get someone come fix a mudded mess.

I recut a few sheets, dug out the badly set screws and added course screws and hired another company to finish. Unfortunately it cost me more money and my time. Lesson learned for next time. Hang my own sheets, and pay someone to come tape it.
Sorry you had a bad experience, honestly a lot of our drywallers in my area are the same in terms of quality. On almost every job I've done, I got to cut out about 5-10% of the total drywall to repair and fill it. Preventable stuff like blow outs on the corners, around electrical boxes, dropped sheets, incorrect screw depths (either too deep or too shallow) and more. Good finish work starts with a good drywall job. Quick setting drywall mud for repair is a must these days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Follow up to this thread.
So the guys came and put 20 sheets of drywall up in less than 2 hours. Father-Son Team. Father in his 70's pulls out a corded electric drywall gun, plugs in and does a very decent job. quick but clean work, clean cuts and proper screw depth. The son who claims he had been doing it 35 years had a battery operated unit that didn't seem to have a stopper installed or it wasn't calibrated. He blew well past the paper or missed the studs on about 30-40% of the screws he put in. Under cut the drywall even though I specifically told him the door guy left huge gaps and that I was using a 2 1/4" door trim....

They insisted on fine threaded screws but also used a good amount (50% or so) of course threaded screws left in their pouch. They didn't fill their pouches with the fine threaded screws I bought them, left me with an almost full box of screws I will never need unless I steel stud my basement.

Afterwards the taper that organized the job claimed they were the best, and defended their work. I said if you think they are the best I can't risk you taping/mudding my place. He was ready to just mud over all the blown through screws, and fill all the big gaps with lite weight all purpose and proceed to tape on top. I paid for the hanging and fired him for the taping. I'm sure he was capable, but I just couldn't risk having to get someone come fix a mudded mess.

I recut a few sheets, dug out the badly set screws and added course screws and hired another company to finish. Unfortunately it cost me more money and my time. Lesson learned for next time. Hang my own sheets, and pay someone to come tape it.
I hate to hear that for you, I wish there were more fathers and sons working in this trade together. Drywall is a dying art in many places, but there's still no shortage of slophounds.
Good hangers usually end up becoming finishers too. Finishing behind yourself will teach you what errors in your ways which need to be remedied. It's difficult to produce a good, tight hang with fine threads into wood. May as well glue boards to the ceilings and shoot em on with a roof nailer too. Too many threads per inch, they're basically nails. A coarse thread is what sucks the board up tight against the studs.

Sounds to me the son should pay more attention to how his father works & take heed to what it is he's doing differently. Believe it or not, but running real screw gun is a pivotol constituent to a job hung versus a job hung well. I was given a screw man last year who would drive me insane using one of those truly useless cordless hunks of garbage..... He insisted on self tappers on light guage too, it drove me up the wall, & he'd try to argue with me. I'd cuss. I'd cuss him. I'd cuss the contractor we worked for for not ripping that gun out of his hand & making him learn to use a real gun. I cussed, stuck him up on a ladder, told him he's not allowed to screw flats or angles, & I made him stay up there to tack the boards as I stood them while I cut-toted-routed- then stabbed sharps in everything myself up to 7'. I had to turn just about every one of his screws too. Next job I removed that gun from that contractor's trailer before we went out of town & I told both of them what I did after a 6 hr drive to Mobile. I stuck one of those corded dewaults in his hand & told him tie a knot in the cord & get used to dragging it around. Almost instantly I heard a completely different hanger. The sound alone told me everything. He was quicker, cleaner, more efficient & had to reluctantly admit that there is no comparison.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top