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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've done smaller drywall projects in the past (single rooms) with trowels but am working on finishing our basement which is a little over 200 sheets. I'll also be finishing two garages in the future. I'm looking for tools to help save time and have a nicer finish (and less sanding). At the moment, I have a banjo, and an inside and outside corner roller. I'm looking at compound tubes, applicators, flushers/angle heads, and flat boxes and was looking for some advice.

1. Inside Corner Applicators - I've looked at 2-wheel, 4-wheel, 1-way, 2-way and plastic applicators. Any particular reason to lean toward one over the others? I've heard that the plastic applicators provide the most mud (which could be good or bad), the 2-wheel applicators can give more control, the wheeled applicators are a little harder to get a consistent layer of mud (compared to the plastic ones with the groves), and the 1-way applicators require a little more manipulation to get mud applied to the full corner (you need to flip it over).

2. Compound Tubes - I'm looking at Platinum Drywall Tools, TapeTech, Columbia, LEVEL5, BTE, Can-Am and Blueline. The prices range from $160-$289 for a 42" tube. It seems like a fairly simple tool (not a lot of complex moving parts). Is there a big difference between these tubes? Is there a particular brand I should gravitate toward or stay away from?

3. 4" Flat Applicator - I'm looking at one of these applicators to add the first coat of mud over top of the tape. Is this necessary or can I just use a flat box? It just seems that there is a "lot" of compound required to fill in the factory edge and am not sure if the flat box can output that much mud.

4. Flushers/Angle Heads - Obviously, there is a big price difference here? Given the size of the job and being new to using these tools should I gravitate toward one or the other? With the flushers, I'm seeing a few different "varieties" and was looking for some pros/cons of the different types. I see some that are just flat surfaces (Better-Than-Ever 2), some that a triangle toward the back (Better-Than-Ever 3.5) and some that have a hole in them (TapeTech 3). What's the difference here? Are the latter two designed to get rid of excess mud so it doesn't get pushed out of the sides creating ridges?

5. Flat Boxes - It seems that most people use two different sizes of flat boxes. Am I able to get by with either a single 10" or 12" box? I was thinking a 10/12" would work for factory edges and I could go down either side of a butt seam to feather out to 20-24" (after an initial pass or final pass down the center of the seam).

Any other advice/recommendations would be greatly appreciated. It may also be worth mentioning that I'm trying to keep my budget under $1500 so I realize some sacrifices may need to be made (either buy a cheaper product (e.g. flusher instead of angle head) or skip out on some tools altogether). This brings me to my final question, does anyone know much about "Platinum Drywall Tools" (Products Archive | Platinum Drywall Tools). They seem significantly cheaper than other more well-known companies and I could get all these tools from them for that price but I'm just not sure how well these tools are made or how well they work as there are not a lot of reviews out there for them.

Again, thanks in advance for any advice, it is greatly appreciated.
 

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Well there is a learning curve with these tools, Platnium will get you by on a few jobs unsure on resale value,
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well there is a learning curve with these tools, Platnium will get you by on a few jobs unsure on resale value,
Yeah, I figured there would be a learning curve. I found that to be true with the banjo. The first few seams I did I hated it but after doing one room I got the hang of it and by the end of the project I was very glad I had it. Any particular tool have a higher difficulty learning curve than the other or do they all just take a little practice.
 

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Yeah, I figured there would be a learning curve. I found that to be true with the banjo. The first few seams I did I hated it but after doing one room I got the hang of it and by the end of the project I was very glad I had it. Any particular tool have a higher difficulty learning curve than the other or do they all just take a little practice.
Little practice and some youtube
 

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I am currently using Platinum Drywall Finishing set from amazon (about $1200) it includes:
Pump (with box filler)
2 boxes, 12" and 10"
3" corner finisher (a vital tool!)
8" corner box (for your finisher)
Corner roller
and straight threaded handle, bent threaded handle, straight non threaded handle, and a box handle

I highly recommend this set, I've been using it for about 6 months and it works well. Not the best, for example, I had to adjust the nuts on the 10" box to have the different levels to work properly.
Then if you want to upgrade, it would probably be Level 5, then Columbia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am currently using Platinum Drywall Finishing set from amazon (about $1200) it includes:
Pump (with box filler)
2 boxes, 12" and 10"
3" corner finisher (a vital tool!)
8" corner box (for your finisher)
Corner roller
and straight threaded handle, bent threaded handle, straight non threaded handle, and a box handle

I highly recommend this set, I've been using it for about 6 months and it works well. Not the best, for example, I had to adjust the nuts on the 10" box to have the different levels to work properly.
Then if you want to upgrade, it would probably be Level 5, then Columbia.
Excellent! I've been having a very hard time finding reviews on Platinum tools. I'm glad to hear it is working fairly well for you. I think I may give some of their tools a try. Thanks for the feedback.
 

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I also meant to say when doing corners, make sure your mud is mixed really thin. I usually have a bucket of Plus 3 labeled "Corner Mud" just for this application. Fun stuff! Let us know how it all goes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I also meant to say when doing corners, make sure your mud is mixed really thin. I usually have a bucket of Plus 3 labeled "Corner Mud" just for this application. Fun stuff! Let us know how it all goes!
Thanks for the tip. Will keep you posted.
 

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Drywall is a very good company that makes different tools. They are specialized in tools for building and other related things. I bought from them the instruments I needed when I was building my barn. I bought a very good knife for working for them, so I started to use it in my main work. I have some orchards with apple trees, so I usually need a good knife for working. Sometimes it saves some time because I don't need to go back and take my tree trimming tools to do some work that can be done in some minutes. I always care it with myself when I am working.
 
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