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I just got a betterthanever 3.5" corner flusher. I'm having trouble at the top of the corners. I'm either not able to set the tape good enough for the first 6" or the tape hooks and pulls down. I'm still having to use a ladder to fix them after I run the flusher.
I was also having trouble with the bottom but tried it flipped over from the bottom and it set everything fine.

Is there anything I can do to get a better job at the top?
 

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I just got a betterthanever 3.5" corner flusher. I'm having trouble at the top of the corners. I'm either not able to set the tape good enough for the first 6" or the tape hooks and pulls down. I'm still having to use a ladder to fix them after I run the flusher.
I was also having trouble with the bottom but tried it flipped over from the bottom and it set everything fine.

Is there anything I can do to get a better job at the top?
That's a common problem with angles. I have seen guys use the flushers with great success, but I use a corner roller and then a glazer. I still run in to the same problem once in a while. I think it's all about getting the feel of the tool.
 

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wasn't sure what that brand was but after looking at one they do look a little cheasy , being that you are new don't get sucked into the junk tools . to properly glaze an angle you must roll it out good , and it also the tape has to be square into the angle or it will give you all sorts of problems , next i was thinking that you were using a banjo also am i correct ? I have yet to see anyone that uses a banjo that can decently roll and glaze out an angle the main fact is a banjo just does not leave enough mud on the tape , even with it wide open you just won't get enough mud flow behind the tape as you would with a bazooka ... which i think i will post another post on that . that will get the fire :furious: going between bazooka and banjo tapers ....
 

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I just got a betterthanever 3.5" corner flusher. I'm having trouble at the top of the corners. I'm either not able to set the tape good enough for the first 6" or the tape hooks and pulls down. I'm still having to use a ladder to fix them after I run the flusher.
I was also having trouble with the bottom but tried it flipped over from the bottom and it set everything fine.

Is there anything I can do to get a better job at the top?
I use a roller, then a flusher.
 

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wasn't sure what that brand was but after looking at one they do look a little cheasy , being that you are new don't get sucked into the junk tools . to properly glaze an angle you must roll it out good , and it also the tape has to be square into the angle or it will give you all sorts of problems , next i was thinking that you were using a banjo also am i correct ? I have yet to see anyone that uses a banjo that can decently roll and glaze out an angle the main fact is a banjo just does not leave enough mud on the tape , even with it wide open you just won't get enough mud flow behind the tape as you would with a bazooka ... which i think i will post another post on that . that will get the fire :furious: going between bazooka and banjo tapers ....
When I switched from bazooka to banjo I actually had to modify my banjo to get enough mud flow. Of course I have to kick a bucket around to reach some of the tops. And if the safety inspector is around, no stilts or buckets allowed. Bottom line, banjo can work. Messy.
 

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When I switched from bazooka to banjo I actually had to modify my banjo to get enough mud flow.
My Ames Cobra banjo has always seemed to give enough mud when I open it up. Maybe wider aperture than other types?

Of course I have to kick a bucket around to reach some of the tops. And if the safety inspector is around, no stilts or buckets allowed. Bottom line, banjo can work. Messy.
I did a few 10' and higher corners from the floor at one job with my banjo - hanging ceilings were going in so I didn't have to worry about horizontal ceiling tapes. I got about a 3 footer of one these at a liquidation store for $3 to do it with:

I'd stand in front of a corner with my banjo between my feet, tape dispensing end of it pointed up. Then I'd pull out tape till I could grab the end of the tape with the reacher. I'd then pull out more tape with the one hand not holding the reacher, and carry the tape with the reacher up to the top of where I wanted it on the wall. I'd stick tape into corner, and then use reacher to push tape into the wall in spots - I sometimes wouldn't get it perfect into corner, but I was new at it, and it still rolled and flushered well enough. With the mud not too thin, clean.

I'm going to get a 2' grabber for 8 and 9' walls. $2 at the liquidation store.
 

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My Ames Cobra banjo has always seemed to give enough mud when I open it up. Maybe wider aperture than other types?



I did a few 10' and higher corners from the floor at one job with my banjo - hanging ceilings were going in so I didn't have to worry about horizontal ceiling tapes. I got about a 3 footer of one these at a liquidation store for $3 to do it with: http://www.amazon.com/PikStik-Aluminum-Reacher-Inch-Yellow/dp/B000H8VPNG/ref=pd_bxgy_sg_img_b

I'd stand in front of a corner with my banjo between my feet, tape dispensing end of it pointed up. Then I'd pull out tape till I could grab the end of the tape with the reacher. I'd then pull out more tape with the one hand not holding the reacher, and carry the tape with the reacher up to the top of where I wanted it on the wall. I'd stick tape into corner, and then use reacher to push tape into the wall in spots - I sometimes wouldn't get it perfect into corner, but I was new at it, and it still rolled and flushered well enough. With the mud not too thin, clean.

I'm going to get a 2' grabber for 8 and 9' walls. $2 at the liquidation store.
My wife threw away my grabber after I chased a few of her friends around with it after a few too many at my birthday party. I'm harmless of course.
 

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I think you have to get the feel for it. I've been using it for 10 years and never had a problem with it. Keep using it and you'll see that's all you need.
 

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My Ames Cobra banjo has always seemed to give enough mud when I open it up. Maybe wider aperture than other types?



I did a few 10' and higher corners from the floor at one job with my banjo - hanging ceilings were going in so I didn't have to worry about horizontal ceiling tapes. I got about a 3 footer of one these at a liquidation store for $3 to do it with: http://www.amazon.com/PikStik-Aluminum-Reacher-Inch-Yellow/dp/B000H8VPNG/ref=pd_bxgy_sg_img_b

I'd stand in front of a corner with my banjo between my feet, tape dispensing end of it pointed up. Then I'd pull out tape till I could grab the end of the tape with the reacher. I'd then pull out more tape with the one hand not holding the reacher, and carry the tape with the reacher up to the top of where I wanted it on the wall. I'd stick tape into corner, and then use reacher to push tape into the wall in spots - I sometimes wouldn't get it perfect into corner, but I was new at it, and it still rolled and flushered well enough. With the mud not too thin, clean.

I'm going to get a 2' grabber for 8 and 9' walls. $2 at the liquidation store.
sounds like you are making way more work for yourself , if you can't reach far enough out use a pair of stilts ??? also sounds mighty messy and not to professional ... Use a bazooka ... that's what they are intended for so you don't have to screw around mickey mousing with a half a$$ way to get something done :hammer:
 

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When I switched from bazooka to banjo I actually had to modify my banjo to get enough mud flow. Of course I have to kick a bucket around to reach some of the tops. And if the safety inspector is around, no stilts or buckets allowed. Bottom line, banjo can work. Messy.


Why would you switch from a bazooka to a banjo?:blink:
 

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Why would you switch from a bazooka to a banjo?:blink:
You are correct , don't make any sense to revert to something that i consider a more primitive tool , It does have its uses but all & all use the right tools for the right job...how else are you going to make any money ?
 

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A few years ago on somewhat a similar topic I had hired a new guy , sent him out to a new home to start . I decided I would go check up on him that afternoon and he was hand taping standing on a bucket as he called it walking a bucket along the wall applying mud to the ring angle , really pissed me off he could have had half the home done but had hardly anything done because of his method of taping , I had to tell him if I ever caught him again hand taping a job he would be fired ... you just can't make any money doing things in a slow methodical method .....contractors want to see progress .
 

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sounds like you are making way more work for yourself , if you can't reach far enough out use a pair of stilts ???
Before I'd use stilts, I'd probably try to create an upgraded version of something like this:
~

I've never used stilts and don't plan on it. An owner of our company division doesn't push them, either, as he once told me he almost really hurt himself a couple of times when using them, including almost really nailing the back of his head on the edge of a metal beam when he once went over backwards hard. Doesn't want that to happen to others.

Only one guy in our company division uses stilts anymore, and he just about did a header on the last job he used them, slipping on some mud he'd dropped on the floor while mudding a bulkhead. Hurting oneself isn't how the work gets done. Things like that can also potentially cause you grief for a long time after, maybe for life.

I can wheel around on things like my 4' and 6' mini-scaffolds to most places quite fast when needed, and I'd say they're safer (6' has outrigger bottoms), and easy to get down from if I want. In the job I was mentioning, however, it was a commercial reno job with lots of stuff laying around the floor in the middle of the rooms, including about the corners. A little hard to get around in some places at times, even with a small scaffold. Even trying to properly put something like a step ladder into some corners wasn't too easy, unless one moved things around.

also sounds mighty messy
Were you there? I already said it was clean when I did it.

Maybe sounds messy to you, but it wasn't. Any tool I have, I can usually get onto running well quickly, including my banjo. But I have heard some people can't run them, or run them well. I can't understand why.

and not to professional ... Use a bazooka ... that's what they are intended for so you don't have to screw around mickey mousing with a half a$$ way to get something done :hammer:
What's "professional" and "mickey mousing with a half a$$ way to get something done" in this situation?
Your way: Thinning down taping mud enough for bazooka; then unless you're running more than one pump on jobsite, putting only pump into mud (inconveniently tying it up at times) and getting it ready, including maybe clearing out whatever is already in the pump; then pulling out the bazooka and loading it, including loading and threading the tape; then getting the bazooka feeding tape and mud well enough; then applying thinned down mud with tape, which will take longer to dry than the mud I can use in my banjo, so we can't get back into the corners sooner if we want; then emptying the bazooka and cleaning it; then clearing pump, to go back to pumping coating mud; for only a few corners?
My way: After thinning mud enough so I could pour it into banjo okay enough, I safely had the tapes placed in little enough time, with a nice even coating of not as thinned down taping mud on the tapes, that rollered and flushered out fine. No potential mud issues to clean up after from the taping or flushing. It only takes a minute or 2 to clean my banjo out at end of day. Once I've used it, I often leave it in water till then, in case I want to use it again during the day. Always ready to go, unlike a bazooka.

With a little more practice, I'd get it done even faster than I did this first time. Making an approriate way to attach my banjo upright to something like the side of a bucket - maybe a partially filled mud bucket for refilling the banjo, so I don't have to hold the banjo upright between my feet or go running back for more mud - will be something I'll look at doing.

My super taper could possibly also do such a job as well, though, maybe even better in some ways. But mud would likely have to be a little thinner than I can get away with in my banjo. It's just not quite as convenient to get it out and mudded up at times, either, as I can usually find more things to conveniently use my banjo on around a site than I can the super taper.
 

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Why would you switch from a bazooka to a banjo?:blink:
I'm doing smaller jobs without a helper. I typically need a few guys to wipe down behind the bazooka to be effective. I do all commercial work with acoustical ceilings. Lord knows I wouldn't want be running top angle with a banjo, my shoulder hurts just thinking about it.
 

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Before I'd use stilts, I'd probably try to create an upgraded version of something like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InRGtm4xmSg ~

I've never used stilts and don't plan on it. An owner of our company division doesn't push them, either, as he once told me he almost really hurt himself a couple of times when using them, including almost really nailing the back of his head on the edge of a metal beam when he once went over backwards hard. Doesn't want that to happen to others.

Only one guy in our company division uses stilts anymore, and he just about did a header on the last job he used them, slipping on some mud he'd dropped on the floor while mudding a bulkhead. Hurting oneself isn't how the work gets done. Things like that can also potentially cause you grief for a long time after, maybe for life.

I can wheel around on things like my 4' and 6' mini-scaffolds to most places quite fast when needed, and I'd say they're safer (6' has outrigger bottoms), and easy to get down from if I want. In the job I was mentioning, however, it was a commercial reno job with lots of stuff laying around the floor in the middle of the rooms, including about the corners. A little hard to get around in some places at times, even with a small scaffold. Even trying to properly put something like a step ladder into some corners wasn't too easy, unless one moved things around.



Were you there? I already said it was clean when I did it.

Maybe sounds messy to you, but it wasn't. Any tool I have, I can usually get onto running well quickly, including my banjo. But I have heard some people can't run them, or run them well. I can't understand why.



What's "professional" and "mickey mousing with a half a$$ way to get something done" in this situation?
Your way: Thinning down taping mud enough for bazooka; then unless you're running more than one pump on jobsite, putting only pump into mud (inconveniently tying it up at times) and getting it ready, including maybe clearing out whatever is already in the pump; then pulling out the bazooka and loading it, including loading and threading the tape; then getting the bazooka feeding tape and mud well enough; then applying thinned down mud with tape, which will take longer to dry than the mud I can use in my banjo, so we can't get back into the corners sooner if we want; then emptying the bazooka and cleaning it; then clearing pump, to go back to pumping coating mud; for only a few corners?
My way: After thinning mud enough so I could pour it into banjo okay enough, I safely had the tapes placed in little enough time, with a nice even coating of not as thinned down taping mud on the tapes, that rollered and flushered out fine. No potential mud issues to clean up after from the taping or flushing. It only takes a minute or 2 to clean my banjo out at end of day. Once I've used it, I often leave it in water till then, in case I want to use it again during the day. Always ready to go, unlike a bazooka.

With a little more practice, I'd get it done even faster than I did this first time. Making an approriate way to attach my banjo upright to something like the side of a bucket - maybe a partially filled mud bucket for refilling the banjo, so I don't have to hold the banjo upright between my feet or go running back for more mud - will be something I'll look at doing.

My super taper could possibly also do such a job as well, though, maybe even better in some ways. But mud would likely have to be a little thinner than I can get away with in my banjo. It's just not quite as convenient to get it out and mudded up at times, either, as I can usually find more things to conveniently use my banjo on around a site than I can the super taper.
well i don't tie up my pumps because i own many of them but never use them anymore unless it is a very small job i use a pneumatic pump which i can mix up 15 gals at a time i can fill a bazooka probably faster than you could fill your banjo.... and again the right tool for the job . you can scoot your little mini baker along as fast as you like a also own at least ten of them alone , but as far as being safe , think again , anything has a certain amount of hazard to it , i have seen many accidents on those so called safe scaffolds , in fact seen one guy collapse one when it the wheel hit a vent hole in the floor he broke both wrists.... come on admit there is no way you can string with a banjo with speed compared to a bazooka.... I probably could have 10 sheets taped and wiped out before you even had five strung out let alone wiped out .... its all in your mind :eek: and cleaning a bazooka is a breeze ....
 

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One more thing i think that i should remind you of didn't you mentioned "and one of the owners" , are you self-employed or an employee ? Personally if you are not an owner yourself how would you know what makes money and what doesn't ,,, not saying all tapers that are employees are like this because most are hard working trying to make there employer's money but there are a few within their twisted little minds that think they know everything and just do things their own way even if it is wrong ,that being the case why would they not be working for themselves ? and the y-tube thing seen that years ago had a guy that came to work for me doing the same thing I found the rest of his talents followed the same mentality he didn't last a day with me for that B.S
 

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Most people that knock stilts, have never even tried them on, and their glasses are normally half empty. And in my mind, the only use for a banjo is playing a duel with some hillbilly sat on the front porch.
 
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