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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
HI:thumbup:
Dont want to bore with repetitions is a long story cause i have to import frome States to near Antartica :yes:(Argentina my country)

So, i want know if 72" is useful for a ceiling 8feet, 9feet, 10feet and 11feet

suposing I would have a super finish(small) handle.. Do you think it is possible to mudd an 11' and 12' ceiling as well as an 8' with a 72" handle (not with ease but if its possible)? (Have you ever seen a "bandera Argentina"..? I never have seen a flat box handle! If you undestand ):thumbsup:


bandera Argentina= my country flag (light blue, white, light blue with a sun in middle, similar to seeing to the sky):D
 

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if you have arms like a gorilla, maybe....i can't see boxing 8ft ceilings with a 6ft handle....the brake hand would have to be down at your knees or you would have to be 3ft in front of the box and that would be a sore day as well..

If it were me...I would opt for a shorter premier style handle and get a screw in extension if you need it for higher stuff....here in us, typical houses are 8ft or 9ft ceilings most of the time with the exception of garages or maybe a few rooms throughout...you can hop on stilts, scaffold or do a few flats here or there by hand....i would say a 34-42" handle would be the most used handle
 

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if you have arms like a gorilla, maybe....i can't see boxing 8ft ceilings with a 6ft handle....the brake hand would have to be down at your knees or you would have to be 3ft in front of the box and that would be a sore day as well..

If it were me...I would opt for a shorter premier style handle and get a screw in extension if you need it for higher stuff....here in us, typical houses are 8ft or 9ft ceilings most of the time with the exception of garages or maybe a few rooms throughout...you can hop on stilts, scaffold or do a few flats here or there by hand....i would say a 34-42" handle would be the most used handle
Agreed

Also just to add, it will also depend on how tall you are also. If your 6 ft tall, you can reach 9 ft high ceilings with some strain with a 36" handle, a 42" does make life more easy though. But a 36" is do able if your 6ft or taller. The shorter the handle, is more easy to control on the walls, and I'm sure most will agree with that statement......... but, weather your going to be doing lay downs or stand ups, may also weigh into your decision. If you think your going to be doing more stand ups, then purchase a 42", if lay downs then something shorter.

I personally would not go anything longer than 42"

Maybe look into making your self some form of leg extensions also :yes:
 

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42" handle is a good happy-medium:thumbsup:
You can buy an extendable handle if you can afford a few extra $$$.
Forget the 72" one though, its great for REALLY high ceilings but you cant do cupboards/closets or stair walls with it and I have to put the seats down in my car just to fit it in!
42" is the best bet. Good luck
 

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The 72" handle will be in your way alot of the time. In order for you to get the most out of your box, the pressure needs to be applied to the blade. The closer you are to being perpindicular to the joint with the handle, the more pressure will be applied to the blade. The longer handle will be too long at times and cause you to run your box with the handle at a tighter angle to your wallboard surface, causing the pressure to be distributed to the entire box rather than the blade.

For 8' and 9' ceilings, the 42" handle works for me. I am over 6' tall. The extendable handles may be the choice for you, depending on your particualr applications. My choiced for the all purpose happy medium is definately the 42" handle. I can still get into most closets with it too.
 

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I use a 72" for 10'-12' ceilings. With a 72" you can't handle the box with one hand and the brake with the other (unless you have over a 6" reach with your arms extended, which I don't). I use a 38", 60" and a 72" to cover differing lid heights. I'm 6' tall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you everyboydy!!!!!!!!!!!!
Really usefull!!

But here (Argentina) we have a situation..
Ceilings use to be at an 9' media (a few 8' a few 10') + I'm 5.7ft..

Do you thing now, a 54" handle is a bad idea??????
(y know en Xtend TT is best, but just another option if it does exist)
 

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Thank you everyboydy!!!!!!!!!!!!
Really usefull!!

But here (Argentina) we have a situation..
Ceilings use to be at an 9' media (a few 8' a few 10') + I'm 5.7ft..

Do you thing now, a 54" handle is a bad idea??????
(y know en Xtend TT is best, but just another option if it does exist)
It really depends on what your doing....if your main intentions are just for ceilings, then the 53 will be fine..if you plan to do walls with the box too, then the 54 will be difficult...you need more control on walls than you do on ceilings so I would tailor to whatever works best for walls..you can do blueline and still be with one handle...just get 1 or 2 extensions for sizes you need..

I personally use extender handle...it is a little more out of pocket initially, but worth it....no switching or screwing in extensions....it has a small use factor to get used to because it is a little heavier, it takes getting used to leaving clean laps/takeoffs..but if 90% of your work is 10ft standups like in my case, its nice to go into a room..pull up your bottoms..refill..drop the handle to length and then pull them down

i'll take capt's phrase here as there is more ways to skin a cat than one..it really boils down to what is comfortable to you in the end
 

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FASTER THAN A MARE
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I used a 4 ft for years and i was good handle but then I bought the Hydra columbia handle
 

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I used a 4 ft for years and i was good handle but then I bought the Hydra columbia handle
Not saying that such extendable handles as TapeTech's aren't good ones as well, guijarrero - never tried one - but I also use a Columbia Hydra-Reach extendable handle. I find the length adaptability useful. It goes from 42" to 63".

And though I've never run a Premier style (Blue Line?) handle, so don't know their quality, what Bill said in his post sounds like a nice choice as well, if attaching the extensions isn't much to do:

If it were me...I would opt for a shorter premier style handle and get a screw in extension if you need it for higher stuff....here in us, typical houses are 8ft or 9ft ceilings most of the time with the exception of garages or maybe a few rooms throughout...you can hop on stilts, scaffold or do a few flats here or there by hand....i would say a 34-42" handle would be the most used handle
 

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i ran the premier handles for about 2yrs in transition between ames (rentals) and buying the concorde extender handle..

the premier handles are good handles...just heavier than the ames/tapetech/tapemaster style...but I don't think they are as heavy as the concorde extender handle and nothing beats free....older guy I knew gave me the handle because he liked tapetech handle better.

the screw in isn't a problem...it just screws into the end of the handle under the brake handle...I had a 36" handle with a 1ft and 2ft extension...may have been 18 and 36 now that I think about it....can't remember...the only thing about it is getting used to running the brake with your "push" hand when the extension is in place

i'm a lefty and usually run brake in right hand nd push with left...when you use extension, you would have to brake and push with left

but if you were to ask me today what I would do...i would buy extender of your choice and be done with it...none of the oh ****..i left the extension in the shed...type thing
 
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