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Discussion Starter #1
If I have a plan of (for example) a 2500 sf standard house and based upon sf and 9' ceiling height I want to say $x/sf * y sf = budget" do you have any rule of thumb for what y should be?

In other words can I make an educated guess at how many sf f drywall based upon the sf of the house, knowing full well I have to measure later.
 

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Best to measure the actual drywall square footage of the house. Measure the floor footage of the house. And divide actual footage by the floor footage. See what you get as a multiplier. Do this a few times to see if what works for one job will work in another. I would never bid a job this way. But multipliers can be a good rule of thumb to check that you did not make an arithmetic error on your footage totals.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm not bidding it, just budgeting it based up the plan drawings which is why I'm trying to determine if there is a reasonable multiplier.
 

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Depends. 3.5-5 is a maybe good range. Maybe. Maybe not. A 20x 20 garage minus door footage with 8' walls gives you a multiplier of 2.32. A 10' tall 2'x8' closet minus door gives you a multiplier of 11. But you could have done that arithmetic yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I could do all the arithmetic, what I'm hoping is there is a rule of thumb that reasonably applies to a typical house as opposed to a single room like a garage. It obviously won't be completely correct, but if I can be close on average it would extremely helpful when making budgets to have an allowance that is reasonable early in the process. The only way I have a real number is when subs give me bids anyway.
 

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"what I'm hoping is there is a rule of thumb that reasonably applies to a typical house" There is not. Do the necessary work or suffer the consequences. If you are competitively bidding against others who are properly measuring the job, then you really need to know your measurements are fairly close. Or you will lose work to overestimating the job. Worse yet, you will underbid, get the job, and do the underestimated portion of the work for free.
 
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